Built Environment Decay and Health Situation of Slum Dwellers in Residential Cores of Akure, Nigeria

Owoeye J O, Omole F K

Abstract


The public worldwide is now fully aware of its health and life sustainability being put at greater risk with the present level of poor sanitary conditions of the built environment in most of our cities. In this paper, the sanitary condition of the built environment of residential core of Akure was investigated to establish its close relationship with the health situation of its dwellers. Some ecological data involving housing conditions, condition of sanitary facilities; especially the water supply source, sewage and refuse disposal methods, drainage system, kitchen and bathroom facilities were collected using questionnaire survey, personal interview, direct observation, demographic and facility survey. Data on health situation of dwellers were also collected from available health institutions around the place. The research population was based on total number of existing buildings from which a sample of 20.0% was taken for interview. Findings from the study reveal that environmental variables are significantly related to health situation of people in the area. The paper suggests some policy guidelines, including redevelopment (in some parts of the area), upgrading and provision of basic facilities through the UBSP scheme. Besides, regular sanitary inspection, public enlightenment and regular environmental campaign are recommended for sustainable management of the area. On implementation, the paper suggests that the local people should not be underrated; they should be involved in every phase of the project. It is also expected of the three levels of governments (local, state, and federal) to take active part in the programe particularly in the area of mobilization, training of staff and funding.


Keywords


built environment, decay, health situation, slum dwellers, residential core, sustainable management

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.11634/21679622150482

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American Journal of Human Ecology

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